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Treatment of Wounds in the Dog

TREATMENT OF WOUNDS IN THE DOG.

Many cases of accidental wounds in the dog originate from bites inflicted during fighting. Such wounds vary in extent and gravity from a simple puncture of the skin to a serious laceration of the tissues. Again a punctured wound caused by a bite may extend very deeply, and unless surgically treated is likely to bring about septicemia.

Wounds due to bites should always be regarded as septic, and it is essential to provide free drainage and to disinfect the parts thoroughly. Sutures should never be em ployed in such cases, except in instances where an extensive laceration of the skin is present, or an organ such as the ear is torn. In a deep puncture occurring in the forearm or thigh infection is likely to spread along the tendon sheaths and fasciae unless a free incision is made and thorough disinfection carried out.

The tendency for the dog to lick his wounds is well known, and except in the case of pene trating wounds of the abdominal cavity which have been surgically treated and sutured it is generally admitted that healing is hastened rather than retarded by the licking process.

With regard to the precautions necessary to prevent the animal from interfering with wounds, in which it is desirable to secure healing by primary union, the reader is referred to the article on"Surgical Technique."For informa tion on the indications for applying surgical dressings in the treatment of wounds in canine practice the reader is also referred to the same article. Penetrating wounds of the abdominal cavity are treated on similar lines to surgical wounds in this region, but with a far greater degree of success than is the case in equine practice.

One point which must be remembered in con nection with the employment of antiseptics of the coal-tar series while dressing wounds in the dog and cat is the danger of absorption and the production of toxic effects. By employ ing Dakin's solution this risk is obviated.

treated, free and bites