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Dengue Dandy Fever

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DENGUE. DANDY FEVER.

A febrile contagious disease, attended with rheumatic symp toms and with an eruption resembling measles. It occurs in the West Indies and in some other hot or tropical climates. The period of incubation is short, probably not more than three days. The crisis is rendered indefinite by the recurrence of rheumatic symptoms.

Cerebro-spinal or Tetanoid fever.

Cerebrospinal fever is sometimes called malignant purpuric fever; or epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis. More recently it has been named by Dr. Rosenstein, and as I venture to think most correctly, tetanoid fever. It has been known to occur in England. It is marked by a dark eruption, intense fever, deli rium, and tetanic spasms. It is very fatal. The periods of in cubation and of crisis are not determined. It is probably not contagious.

Typhus fever.

A continued fever attended with a dark mottled rash on the body, great nervous prostration and delirium, but without any specific affection of the bowels. The disease is very contagious, and very fatal. The period of incubation is, in most cases, from ten to twelve days. The crisis is about the fourteenth day after the eruption.

Typhoid or enteric fever.

Typhoid or enteric fever, called also gastro-enteric, owing to the circumstance that in it the stomach and intestines are seats of disease, is marked by a rose-colored rash on the skin, high fever, delirium, and much disturbance of the bowels, Until com paratively modern days typhus and typhoid fevers were con founded together as one disease, in the same way as measles and scarlet fever once were. Typhoid is now known as a distinct af fection, and is distinguished from typhus by the occurrence of special intestinal derangement as well as by the eruption. It is not so readily contagious as typhus. The period of incubation ranges from six to fourteen days. The crisis is about the four teenth day after the eruption. Typhoid, owing to its common connection with bad drainage, has received the vulgar but expres sive name of "drain or cesspool fever."

typhoid, eruption and contagious