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Brood Mares
Brood Mares. Mares Generally Com Mence Breeding At Three Or Font- Years Of Age. Some Commence At Two Years, Which Is Much Too Early. A Mare Will, If Only Moderately Worked, Continue To Breed Till Nearly Twenty. She Is In Heat In The Early Part Of The Spring ; Averages ...

Brooklime
Brooklime (myositis Palustris). This Herb Loves Shallow Streams 'and Wet Ditches, Like The Water-cress, Which It Resembles In Taste. It Flowers And Seeds In June, July, And August. Brooklime Is Known By Its Thick Stalk, Roundish Leaves, And Its Spikes Of Small Bright Blue Flowers. It Grows About A Foot ...

Broom Corn
Corn, Broom-. The Following Account Of The Broom-corn, Its Culture And Uses, Is The Isubstance Of A Communication Made By Mr. I William Allen Of Northampton, Massachusetts, To Mr. H. L. Ellsworth, Commissioner Of Pa Tents. Of The Genus Sorghum (broom-grass) There Are Four Or Five Species. Sorghum Saccharatum Is ...

Broom Rape
Broom-rape (orobanche Major). This Is A Parasitical Plant Which Is Found Amongst The Red Clover ; " Meaning, Perhaps," Says Mr. Main, "a Robber Of Broom, From Its Being Fre Quently Found On Waste Grounds Growing On The Roots Of The Common Broom, And In Fields On The Roots Of ...

Broom
Broom (the Spartisem Scopariwm Or Cyticus Scoparius Of Botanists). Pl. 9, D. An Evergreen Branched Shrub, Native Of Sandy Soils Through Out Europe. The Broom, With Its Gay Yellow Flowers, Blooming From April To June, Its Tough Stalks, And Flat Hairy Pods, Is Well Known "on All Barren And Waste ...

Buck Bean
Buck-bean (menyanthes Trifoliata). This Is A Beautiful Wild Flower, And Deserving Of Cultivation. It Naturally Inhabits Turbarigs, And Marshy Places. In A Garden It Will Live For Many Years", If Planted In A Pot Filled With Peat Earth Mixed With Sphagnum Or Bog Moss, And Plunged In A Pan Of ...

Buck Hunting
Buck Hunting. "in Common Parlance," Says Mr. Blaine, "the Hunting Of A Fallow Deer, Whether Male Or Female, Is Said To Be Buck Hunting." This, According To Mr. Cha Fing, In The Reign Of James Il, Was Formerly Practised After Dinner ; It Was So Fashionable, And So Generally Delighted ...

Buckeye
Buckeye. Under This Name, Michaux Describes Two Species Of Trees In The United ' States, Viz. The Large Buckeye Or Yellow Pavia, (pavia Lutea); And The Ohio Buckeye Or Ohio Horse-chestnut (pavia Ohioensis). The Yellow Pavia, Or Large American Buckeye, Is First Observed On The Alleghany Mountains In Virginia, Near ...

Bud
Bud (fr. Bouton). The Germ Or First Fruit Of A Plant, Which Is The Organized Rudiment Of A Branch Or Flower. Buds Proceed From The Extremities Of The Young Shoots, And Also Along The Branches, Sometimes Single, Sometimes Two And Two, Either Opposite Or Alternate, And Umes Collected In Greater ...

Buffalo Berry Tree
Buffalo Berry Tree (shepardia Mag Noides). Silver-leaved Sheperdia. A Very Beautiful Tree, Discovered By Mr. Nuttall In Missourthe Tree Is Of Upright Growth And Thorny, The Leaves Small And Of A Delicate And Silvery Appearance. The Fertile And Barren Flowers Are Produced On Different Trees. The Fruit Consists Of Berries ...

Buffalo
Buffalo (from The Italian ; Lat. Bubalis). A Term Originally Applied To A Species Of Ante Lope; But Afterwards Transferred, In The Age Of Martial, To Different Species Of The Ox. In Mo Dern Zoology, The Buffaloes, Or The "buhaline Group" Of The Genus Bos, Include Those Species Which Have ...

Bugle Weed
Bugle-weed (virginian Lycopus), A Creeping Perennial Found 'in The Middle States, Frequenting Swamps And Moist Woodlands, Producing Minute White Flowers In June And July. It Constitutes A Prominent Article In The Materia Medica Of Certain German Empirics, In The City Of Lancaster, And Other Parts Of Pennsylvania,—who Prescribe An Infusion ...

Bulb
Bulb (lat. Bulbus; Gr. Ror,cos). A Bud Usually Formed Under Ground, Having Very Fleshy Scales, And Capable Of Separating From Its Parent Plant. Occasionally It Is Produced Upon The Stem, As In Some Lilies. It Contains The Rudiments Of The Future Plant, And Partakes Of The Character Of The Bud ...

Bunias
Bunias. The Oriental Bunias (bunias Orientalis, Pl. 9, K) Is A Perennial Plant, With Leaves, Branches, And Its General Habit Of Herbage, Not Unlike The Wild Chiccory. It Is A Native Of The Levant Or Eastern Shores Of The Mediterranean, And Has Been Cultivated By Way Of Experiment In The ...

Bur Marigold
Bur-marigold (bidens). This Is An Herbaceous, Mostly Annual, Genus Of Plants, Flowering In August And September. It Is Met With Very Frequently In Watery Places, And About The Sides Of Ditches And Ponds. There Are Two Species, With One -or Two Varieties In Each. In The Three-lobed Bur-marigold (b. Tripartita), ...

Bur Reed
Bur-reed (sparganium). Smith (eng. Flora, Vol. I P.73) Enumerates Three Species : 1. The Branched Bur-reed (s. Ramosum); 2. The Unbranched Upright Bur-reed (s. Simplex); 3. The Floating Bur-reed (s. Natans). They Are All Creeping-rooted, Aquatic, Juicy, Smooth, Up Tight, Or Floating Herbs, And Found In Pools And Ditches, And ...

Bur Weed
Bur -weed (xanthium Strumarium). The Broad-leaved Bur-weed Is An Annual Plant, Flowering In August And September, Found In Rich Moist Ground, Or About Dunghills In The South Of England ; But Rare. It Is Herba Ceous Or Somewhat Sbrubby, Rather Downy, Of A Coarse Habit, Root Fibrous ; Stem Solitary, ...

Burdock
Burdock (arctium). There Are Two Spe Cies, The .a. Lappa, Common Burdock Or Clot Bur, And The A. Lardana, Woolly-headed Bur Dock. This Very Cumbrous Weed Is Removed The First Year Of Its Growth By Stubbing, Like Other Things Comprehended By Farmers Under The Name Of Docks, And Paid For ...

Burglary
Burglary. The Breaking Into A Dwell Ing-house In The Night With A Felonious Intent The 7 W. 4, & 1 Viet. C. 86, S. 2, Enact, That Whosoever Shall Burglariously Break And Enter Into Any Dwelling-house, And Shall Assault With Intent To Murder Any Person Being Therein, Or Shall Stab, ...

Bury
Bury. The Wire-worm Is A Sad Enemy. (see Wire. Worn.) The Swarms Of Aphides, Or Plant Lice, Severely Injure The Turnips ; And, From The Smallness Of Their Size, Are Often Unobserved, In 1836 They Committed Terrific Ravages. They Suck The Juices Of The Plant, And Appear In Countless Numbers. ...

Bush Harrow
Bush-harrow. An Implement Consti Tuted Of Any Sort Of Bushy Branches, Inter Woven In A Kind Of Frame, Consisting Of Three Or More Cross-bars, Fixed Into Two End Pieces In Such T Manner As To Be Very Rough And Brushy Underneath. To The Extremities Of The Frame Before Are Generally ...

Bush Harrowing
Bush-harrowing. The Operation Of Harrowing With An Instrument Of The Kind Just Described. It Is Chiefly Necessary On Grass Lands, Or Such As Have Been Long In Pasture, For The Purpose Of Breaking Down And Reducing The Lumps And Clods Of The Earth Or Manures That May Have Been Applied, ...

Bush Vetch
Bush-vetch (vicia Sepiwm). A Plant Of The Vetch Kind, Which May Probably Be Culti Vated To Advantage By The Farmer, Where Lu Cerne And Other Plants Of A Similar Nature Cannot Be Grown. Its Root Is Perennial, Fibrous, And Branching ; The Stalks Many, Some Of Them Shooting Immediately Upwards, ...

Bushel
Bushel (old Fr. Buschel ; Low Lat. Bussel Lus). A Measure Of Capacity For Dry Goods, As Grain, Fruit, Pulse, And Many Other Articles, Con Taining 4 Pecks, 8 Gallons, Or 32 Quarts, And Is 238 The Eighth Of The English Quarter. The Name Seems To Be Derived From An ...

Butt
Butt. A Provincial Term Applied To Such Ridges Or Portions Of Arable Land As Run Out Short At The Sides Or Other Parts Of Fields ; Also To A Vessel Holding 126 Gallons Of Wine, 108 Of Beer ; And To A Measure Of From 15 To 22 Cwts. Of ...

Butter Cup
Butter-cup, Butter-flower, Or Upright Meadow Crow's Foot (ranunculus Bulbosus, Smith). (pl. 10, T.) A Common Perennial Weed, Abounding In Meadows And Pastures, And Blooming In May. The Whole Plant Is Extremely Acrid, So As Often To Be Employed By Country People To Raise A Blister. Bees Are, However, Very Fond ...

Butter
Butter (ger. Butter; Dut. Boter). A Well Known Article Of Domestic Consumption, Com Monly Procured By Churning The Milk Of The Cow. It Was Not An Article Employed By The Early Greeks And Romans. "the Ancient Ro Mans," Says Mr. Aiton (quart. Hwy. ..dgr. Vol. P. 357), "knew Nothing Of ...

Butterfly
Butterfly. The Common English Name, Says Brande (diet. Of Science), Of An Extensive Group Of Insects, As They Appear In Their Last And Fully Developed State, When They Constitute The Most Beautiful And Elegant Examples Of Their Class. These Insects Belong To The Order Lepidoptera, And To The Section Diurna ...

Butternut
Butternut (juglans Cathartica Vel Eine Rea). A Species Of Walnut Growing In The United States, In Different Parts Of Which It Is Known By Different Names. In The New Eng Land States It Generally Takes The Name Of Oil Nut; In Some Of The Middle States It Is Called White ...

Butterwort
Butterwort I(pinguicula Vulgaris). A Perennial Weed Growing In Moist Soils, As Bogs And Wet Heaths. The Viscid Exudation Of The Leaves, Which Are Thick And Glutinous, Says Smith (eng. Flor. Vol. P. 29), Is Reputed To Be Good For The Sore Teats Of Cows, Whence The Yorkshire Name Of This ...

Buxus
Buxus. The Boxwood, Of Which Botanists Commonly Enumerate Three Species : 1. The Arborescens, With Oval Leaves. 2. The With Narrow Leaves. 3. The Suffruticosa, The Species Usually Employed In The Bordering Of Flower-beds. The First Two, When Allowed To Grow In A Natural Manner, Are Deciduous Shrubs Of Fine ...

C Pruning
Pruning, &c. The Second Division Comprehends Those Trees, The Wood Of Which Is Employed In Ship Building, Machinery, Or For Other Useful Pur Poses, Such As The Oak, Elm, Larch, &c., The Culture Of Which Has Been Discussed Under Those Respective Heads. For The Diseases Of Trees, See American Blight, ...

C The Unite States
The Unite]] States, &c. In All Countries, Therefore, Particular Winds Are Noted For Being Accompanied With Either Wet Or Dry Weather. Thus The South And South West Winds Bring Much Moisture Into Britain; While Those From The North And Northeast Ar . Cold, Dry, And Penetrating. Hence The Old Eng ...

Cabbage Varieties Cos Varieties
Cabbage Varieties. Cos Varieties. Drumheaded. Brighton. Brown Dutch. Black-aeeded Green. Tenniaball. Early Egyptinn. Green, Or Capuchin. Green. Prussian. White Or Versailles. Prince's. Silver. Common White. Spotted Or Leopard. Large White. Green And Brown Cilicia, Imperial. Lop. Grand' Admirable. Large Roman. Lettuces Thrive Best In A Light, Rich Soil, With A ...

Cabbage
Cabbage (fr. Tabus; Probably From Cab, Old Fr. For Head, Top, Or Extremity. Ital. Cabuccio ; Dutch, Kabuys. "but The Form Of The Cabbage, Resembling A Head, Shows Caput To Be The Ori Ginal."—todds Johnson. Lat. Brassica ; From Srpscovcs, A Garden Herb ; Or Perhaps From Brachia, From Its ...

Cabbage_2
Cabbage (brassica Olcracea Var. Capitata). The Earliest Variety Is The Early York ; Next The Early Sugarloaf, And Landreth's Large York; Early Battersea Is Late In The Summer. The Flat Dutch And Drumhead Are For Winter Use, And Red Dutch For Pickling. Early And Sum Mer Varieties Are Usually Sown ...

Calandre
Calandre. A Name Given By French Writers To An Insect Of The Scarabaus Or Beetle Tribe, Which Frequently Does Great Injury In Granaries. It Has Two Antenna: Or Horns, Form Ed Of A Great Number Of Round Joints, And Covered With A Soft And Short Down ; From The Anterior ...

Calcareous Soils
Calcareous Soils (from The Latin Mix) Arc Soils Which Contain Carbonate Of Lime (chalk Of Limestone) In Such A Proportion As To Give It A Determinate Character. Calca Reous Sand Is Merely Chalk Or Limestone Di Vided Into Pieces Of The Size Of Sand. This Variety Abounds On The Seashore ...

Calving Of Cows
Calving Of Cows. The Treatment Be Fore Calving Is To Keep The Cow Moderately Well, Neither Too Fat Nor Too Lean ; Remember That She Commonly Has The Double Duty Of Giving Milk And Nourishing The Foetus; Dry Her Some Weeks Before Calving; Let Her Bowels Be Kept Moderately Open ...

Camellia Japonica
Camellia Japonica. A Beautiful Ever Green Greenhouse Shrub ; But If Carefully At Tended To It Will Blow In The Open Air. It Bears Single, Double, And Semi-double Flowers, In Feb Ruary And March ; And They Are Red, White, Blush-coloured, And Various Other Tints. Plant It Under A South ...

Camlet
Camlet (fr. Camelot ; Ital. Ciarnbelotta ; Span. Camlote ; From The Gr. Gammarr,1). A Stuff Or Cloth Made Of Wool, Silk, And Some Times Of Hair Combined, Especially That Of Goats And Camels. The Real Oriental Camlet Is Made From That Of The Angola Goat. No Canilets Are Made ...

Camphor Tree
Camphor Tree (laurus Camphora). Among The Vegetable Productions Of The Old Continent Which Possess A High Degree Of In Terest For The United States, The Camphor Tree Holds An Eminent Place. It Especially Deserves Attention From The Inhabitants Of The Floridas, Of The Lower Part Of The Carolinas, And Of ...

Canada Thistle
Canada Thistle (carduus Arvensis). This Plant Is Widely Spread In The Northern Part Of The State Of New York, And Has Been Introduced Into Pennsylvania And Many Other Parts Of The Middle States, The Seeds Having Been Sometimes Mixed In Timothy Seed, And Sometimes Entangled In The Fleeces Of Sheep ...

Canada Thistle_2
Canada Thistle.) Dr. Darlington Thinks The Yellow Thistle A Frkteigner Introduced Into The United States. It Is The Most Prickly Of All The Tribe, And Hence Called By Botanists Cardwas Spinosissimus, And Cnicus Horriduus. The Root Of This Is Considered By Some Biennial, By Others Perennial. The Tall Or Tallest ...

Canary Grass
Canary-grass (phalaries Canariensis Pl. 4, A) Is Cultivated In A Few Parts Of The South Of England, And Chiefly In The Isle Of Thanet. The Plant (says Prof. Low) Is Easily Raised, But It Is Of Little Economical Importance ; It Is A Native Of The Canary Islands, But Is ...

Candle Berry Myrtle
Candle-berry Myrtle (myriea Gale). A Hardy Shrub, Native Of Britain, Which Grows To Four Feet High, And Bears A Small Red Blos Som In May And June. It Loves Heath Mould, And Is Propagated By Seed, Or By Dividing The Roots. The Species Called Candle-berry Myrtle In The United States, ...

Candle
Candle (lat. Candela ; Sax. Cannel; Ital. Candelle ; Fr. Chandelle ; Welsh, Canwyll). A Taper Or Cylinder Of Tallow, Wax, Or Spermaceti, The Wick Of Which Is Commonly Of Several Threads Of Cotton Spun And Twisted Together. Candles In England Were Subject For A Length Ened Period To An ...

Cane
Cane. A Provincial Term Used To Signify A Hollow Place, Where Water Stands. It Also Implies A Wood Of Alder, Or Other Aquatic Trees, In A Moist Boggy Situation. In The South-western States Of America There Are Extensive And Almost Impenetrable Cane Brakes, Consisting Of A Rank Growth Of A ...

Canter
Canter. (said To Be An Abbreviation Of Canterbury Gallop, And Derived From The Pil Grims Riding To Canterbury On Easy Ambling Horses.—todd's Johnson.) A Well-known Pace Of The Horse, Which Is Not, Generally, A Natural Pace. When The Horse Is Excited To Move His Station From One Place To Another, ...

Capers
Capers. The Caper Is A Small Prickly Shrub, Cultivated In Spain, Italy, And The South Ern Provinces Of France. The Flowers Are Large Roses Of A Pretty Appearance, But The Flower-buds Alone Are The Objects Of This Culti Vation. They Are Plucked Before They Open, And Thrown Into Strong Vinegar ...

Capital
Capital (lat. Capitalis). The Capital Re Quired By A Farmer, To A Great Extent, Varies With The Soil And Country In Which He Is Placed; All Practical Observations In This Place, There Fore, Can Only Be Of A General Nature. The First And Best Direction, However, To A Farmer Must ...

Capon
Capon (sax. Capon ; Fr. Chapon ; Lat. Cape). If Cocks, When Young, Are Emasculated, It Has A Prodigious Effect Upon Their Condition, And A Similar Effect May Be Produced Upon Young Hens By The Abstraction Of Their Egg-bags. These Operations Have Been Practised Upon Poultry From The Earliest Antiquity, ...

Capon_3
Capon. End In Opposite Directions. It Is For The Pur Pose Of Pushing The Intestines Cut Of The Way An Office Very Well Performed By The Handle Of A Teaspoon. Fig. 1 Represents The Instruments Used In Making Capons, According To The Chinese Me Thod, Reduced Only About One-fourth Their ...

Capon_4
Capon. There Is A Communication In The Farmer's Cabinet, (vol. Ii. P.95,) Upon Keeping Hens, And The Profits From Eggs, From A Poulterer In Eaton, Massachusetts, Which Contains Much Useful Information. On The 1st Of January, Says The Writer, I Had Ten Hens And One Cock. In The Spring Three ...

Capsicum
Capsicum. (supposed Either From Xamrso, Mordeo, To Bite ; Or From Capsa, A Chest.) Cap.. Sicum Annwum. Of This There Are Five Varieties 1. Long-podded. 2. Heart-shaped. 3. Shcrt Podded. 4. Angular-podded. 5. Roland Short Podded. Of The Capsicum Cerasiforme There Are Three Varieties. 1. Cherry-shaped. 2. Bell Shaped, Or ...

Carbon
Carbon (fr. Carbone ; Lat. Carboy. A Hitherto Undecompounded Combustible Body, Which Enters Into The Composition, In Some Form Or Other, Of All Vegetable Substances. In A Perfectly Pure State, Carbon Constitutes Dia Mond. Carbonaceous Substances Are Usually More Or Less Compounded, Containing Hydrogen, Or Sometimes Oxygen, And Azote, Along ...

Carbonates
Carbonates. A Peculiar Class Of Salts Formed By The Combination Of Carbonic Acid Gas With Various Earths, Alkalies, And Metallic Oxides. The Composition Of Those. Most Com Monly Met With By The Farmer Is As Follows:— Acid. Base. Carbonate Of Lime, Chalk, Lime Stone, &c. - - - 66.2 3313 ...

Carbonic Acid Gas
Carbonic Acid Gas. A Peculiar Gas, The Same As That Emitted By Fermenting Beer, Or Other Liquors ; It Is Inhaled By, And Its Car Bon Is The Food Of Plants. It Is Composed Of Carbon 72.73, Oxygen 27.27. See Gases, Their Use To Vegetation, It Is Important To Know, ...

Carob
Carob (ceratoria Caroubier). A Tree Cul Tivated, Extensively In The South Of Europe, The Pods Produced By Which Contain A Sweet, Eat Able •eecula. The Tree Attains A Medium Size, And The Flowers, Which Are Of A Deep Purple Colour, Are Disposed In Clusters. The Fruit Pods Are A Foot ...

Carpet
Carpet (dutch, Karpet ; Ital. Carpetta). A. Covering For Floors, &c., Manufactured Of Wool, Or Other Materials, Worked With The Needle Or By The Loom. Carpets Are Generally Composed Of Linen And Worsted, But The Kidderminster Or Scotch Carpets Are Entirely Fabricated Of Wool. Persian And Turkish Carpets Are The ...

Carriage
Carriage (fr. Carriage). A General Name Applied To Carts, Wagons, And Other Vehicles, Employed In Conveying Passengers, Goods, Merchandise, &c., From One Place To Another, And Which Are Usually Constructed With Two Or Four Wheels. Wheel-carriages First Came Into Use About 1381; They Were Called Whirlicotes, And Were Little Better ...

Carrot
Carrot (fr. Carote). A Well-known An Nual Or Biennial Root, Common Alike To The Field And The Garden. The Wild Carrot, From Whence All Those Now Commonly Cultivated Came, Is A Native Of England, Found Chiefly On Chalky Hills. The Kinds Now Preferred For Field Culture Are The Long Red, ...

Carrot_2
Carrot (daucus Carota Var. Hartensis). The Early Horn Is Best For Table Use. The Long Orange Is More Productive. The Altringham Produces Great Crops, And Is Suitable To Raise For Horses And Cattle. Sow The Seeds In The Mid Dle Of Spring, In A Rich, Sandy Loam, Well Pul Verized, ...

Carrying
Carrying. A Term Used In Horsemanship A Horse Is Said To Carry Low, When, Having Na I Turally An Ill-shaped Neck, He Lowers His Head Too Much. This Fault May Be Remedied By A I Proper Bridle. A Horse Is Said To Carry Well, When His Neck Is Raised Or ...

Cart Lodge
Cart Lodge. A Small Outhouse For Sheltering Carts From The Weather. Farmers Should Be Very Careful To Place Their Carts, &c. Under Proper Shelter, When Out Of Use, As They Will Last Much Longer By This Means Than If Left Exposed In The Yard To The Effects Of The Weather ...

Cart
Cart. A Vehicle Constructed With Two Of More Wheels, And Drawn By One Or More Horses Half A Century Since, Lord Robert Seymour Advocated The Cause Of The Sin Orse Cart: He Observed, That The A , Oapngle-horse Carts Are Universally,1 , D 19,, W Rever They Have Been Attentively ...

Carter
Carter. An Inferior Sort Of Farm Servant, Who Has The Care Of Driving And Foddering The Team. He Should Always Be Chosen As Steady, Regular, Sober, And Trustworthy As Possible, And Be Perfectly Gentle And Humane In His Disposi Tion. It Is Of Great Importance To The Farmer To Have ...

Cast
Cast. A Term Applied To A Swarm Or Flight Of Bees (see Bass); And To Poultry When They Lose Their Feathers Or Moult. It Is Also Used To Denote The Changing Of The Hair And Hoofs Of Horses. Horses Castor Shed Their Hair At Least Once A Year. Every Spring ...

Casting
Casting. The Operation Of Throwing A Horse Down, Which Should Be Performed With Great Care On Straw. Take A Long Rope, Double It, And Cast A Knot A Yard From The Bow ; Put The Bow About His Neck, And The Double Rope Betwixt His Fore Legs, About His Hinder ...

Castor Oil
Castor Oil. The Well Known Medi Cinal Oil Obtained From The Seeds Or Beans Of The Palma Christi, A Plant Indigenous To The West Indies. The Cultivation Of The Pal Ma Christi And The Manufacture Of Castor Oil Is Extensively Carried On In Some Parts Of The United States, And ...

Cat
Cat (felis Cams, L.). A Genus Of Animals Comprising Twenty-one Species, And Belonging To The Same Cla.s As The Lion And The Tiger. Though Origina4ly A Variety Of The Wild Cat, One Of The Most Ferocious Brutes, This Ani Coal Is Now Domesticated. The Former Inhabits Hollow Trees, Especially The ...

Catalpa
Catalpa (bignonia Catalpa). A Shrub Growing In England Thirty Or Forty Feet High ; Its Beautiful Pendulous Flowers Bloom In Au Gust. It Has A Peculiarly Large Bright Green Leaf ; Loves Heat, And Does Not Blow In Wet, Summers. It Is Tolerably Hardy; Easily Raised From Layers Or Seed. ...

Cataract
Cataract. In Farriery, A Disease In The Eyes Of Horses, In Which The Crystalline Humour Is Rendered Opaque, And The Vision Impeded Oe Destroyed. The Only Certain Method Of Cure In These Complaints Is To Remove The Lens By Means Of Extracting Or Couching. By The First Mentioned Operation, An ...

Caterpillar
Caterpillar. The Name Given To The Larva State Of Butterflies And Moths. The Natural History Of Insects So Universally Destructive As Caterpillars, Which In Voracity Are Only Inferior To Locusts, Cannot Fail To Inte Rest All, Whether Residents Of Town Or Country ; And Iris Evident That Persons Acquainted With ...

Cats Milk
Cat's-milk. A Common Name For The Plant Wartwort, Which See. C A T's-t Ai L, Or Timothy Grass (phleum Prate Se, P1. 5, K). This Grass Flou Rishes Best In Moist Deep Loarns. Perennial, Native Of Britain. At The Time Of Flowering, In The End Of June, Sinclair Found The ...

Cattle Dairy
Dairy, Cattle, &c. Cow's Milk Is That Principally Used By Eu Ropeans; That Of The Goat, And Even Of The Sheep, Is Used In Some Parts Of Britain ; That Of The Mare Is A Favourite Beverage In Tartary When It Is Fermented. If Milk Be Left At Rest, The ...

Cattle Plague
Cattle Plague. A General Term Used To Designate A Most Destructive Infectious Pes Tilence, Which Has Within A Few Years Devas Tated The Herds Of Most Parts Of Europe And Some Portions Of The U. S. In France It Is Called Peate, And Le Typhus Contagieux Des Mies Bovines. It ...

Cattle Sheds
Cattle Sheds. The Cow-house Should Be A Capacious, Well-lighted, And Well-venti Lated Building, In Which The Cows Or Oxen Can Be Kept Dry, Clean, And Moderately Warm; A Temperature Of About 60° Is Perhaps The Best. I It Is A Mistaken Idea That Cattle Suffer Materi Ally By Dry Cold. ...

Cattle
Cattle. Under This Head I Propose To Include The Ox Tribe, Bovida, Of The Class Mam Malia, Having Teats Or Mamma These Are Of The Order Rwminantia, Or Ruminating, Or Cud-chew Ing Animals. Of This Tribe There Are Eight Spe Cies :-1. Bos Urus Or Auroch, The Ancient Bison; 2. ...

Cauliflower
Cauliflower (from Lat. Caulis; Bras Sica Oleracea Botrytis). A Species Of Brassica, Of Which There Are Two Varieties ;—the Early, Which Is Smallest And Most Fit For Growth Under Lights, For The Winter-standing Crop; And The Large, For The Open Ground Plantations. Cauli Flower Is Propagated By Seed; The First ...

Caustic
Caustic. In Farriery, A Substance Which, By Its Powerful Operation, Destroys The Texture Of The Part To Which It Is Applied. Corrosive Sublimate Is The Best Caustic ; But That Requires Skilful Hands, For It Is A Dangerous Remedy Ex Cept In The Hands Of The Veterinarian. Mix One Drachm ...

Cedars Of Lebanon
Cedars Of Lebanon (jibies Cedrus). This Sovereign Of The Forest Appears To Have Been Indigenous To Mount Lebanon : But At What Period It Was First Introduced Into Eng And Is Not Known. This Noble Tree Is Now So Well Naturalized In England, That The Seeds Not Only Ripen, But ...

Celebrated Cider Apples Cultivated
Celebrated Cider Apples Cultivated In The United States. 109. Harrison, Or Long Stem. A Native Of Essex, New Jersey. The Celebrated Newark Cider Is Made From This Apple; One Tree In Es Sex County, New Jersey, Produced 100 Bushels In One Year, And 10 Bushels Make A Barrel Of Cider, ...

Celery
Celery (ilpiwin Graveolens). This Is The Wild Original Of Cultivated Celery. The Name Probably Proceeded From Apex, A Tuft Or Crest, Which Its Umbels Form). This Class Of Plants Flourish Best In A Moist Soil, Friable, And Rather Inclining To Lightness ; It Must Be Rich, And That Rather From ...

Celery_2
Celery (opium Graveolens). Sow The Seed Early In Spring, In Rich, Mellow Ground, And In A Situation Where The Plants Can Be Protected From The Parching Heat Of The Sun. It Can Either Be Sown Broadcast Or In Drills, If In Drills, They May Be Half An Inch Deep And ...

Cell_2
Cell. The Vegetable Cell, The Simplest Element Of Growth And Development, Consists Of A Closed Vessel Like An Egg, And Is Composed Of An Outer Solid Membrane Which Contains A Fluid, And Matter Floating In The Fluid, Or At Tached To The Sides. At First The Enclosing Membrane Is Very ...

Chaff Engines
Chaff-engines. That Chaff Has Been Employed As Provender For Live-stock From A Very Early Period, We Have Abundant Evidence. Cato (lib. 54) Recommends It For Oxen ; And Two Centuries Since, Hartlib Recommended Its Use, Mixed With Cut Oats And Peas. The Mode Of Preparing The Chaff, However, From Hay ...

Chalk
Chalk (sax. Cealc; Welsh, Calck ; Celtic, Cal Or Kal). The Carbonate Of Lime, Or Lime United With Carbonic Acid. See Line. Car Bonate Of Lime Exists Abundantly In Various Parts Of The Earth's Surface In The State Of Chalk, Limestone, And Marble ; And In Smaller Masses, As The ...

Chamomile Camomile
Camomile, Chamomile, Common Or Sweet (.anthemis No Bilis. From &oa., On Ac Count Of Its Abundance Of Flowers, Or Luxuri Ance Of Growth. Fr. Camonalle ; Lat. Charno Mina). A Hardy Perennial, Growing On Open Gravelly- Pastures Or Commons, In England, Flowering From June To September, And Well Known For ...

Changes Of Climate
Climate, Changes Of. The Question Has Been Much Debated, Whether The Tempera, Ture Of The Crust Of The Earth Or Of The Incum Bent Atmosphere Has Undergone Any Perceptible Changes Since The Earliest Records, Either From The Efforts Of Man In Clearing Away Forests, Draining Marshes, Cultivating The Ground, Or ...

Charcoal
Charcoal (from Chark, To Burn, And Was Formerly Written Chorke Coal). The Remaining Portion Of Wood After It Has Been Heated To Red Ness For Some Time, Which Dissipates All The Hydrogen And Oxygen Of Which, With Carbon, It Is Composed. (see Carbon.) Charcoal Burning Is A Regular Trade, Followed ...

Charles
Charles.) The Colours Of The Improved Short-horns Are Red Or White, Or A Mixture Of Both ; "no Pure Im Proved Short-horns," Adds Mr. Youatt, " Are Found Of Any Other Colour But Those Above Named." That The Matured Short-horns Are An Admirable Grazier's Breed Of Cattle Is Undoubt Ed: ...

Charlock
Charlock (sax. Ceplice). Pl. 10 G. A Troublesome Weed, Which Abounds In Most Ara Ble Soils, And Is Very Difficult To Expel. In Eng Land It Is Frequently Called Chadlock, Callock, Cor Lock, Corn-kale, And While-rape. There Are Four Dif Erent Species Ofplants,says Sinclair, Confounded Under The Name Of Charlock, ...

Cheese Fly
Cheese-fly And Maggot (piophi:42 Sei). The Small White Larva: Found In Old And Putrescent Cheese, Produce A Small Twc, Winged Fly, About Two Lines In Length, Which Has A Greenish-black, Smooth, And Shining Body. It Is Fully Described In The Quart. Jaunt. Of ?gr. Vol. Xii. P. 125. Dr. Harris ...

Cheese Mites
Cheese-mites. This Is The -rearms Siro, An Almost Microscopic Apterous Insect, Fur Nished With Eight Legs, On The Four First Of Which, Between Two Claws, Is A Vesicle With A Long Neck, To Which The Insect Can Give Every Kind Of Inflexion. "when It Sets Its •foot Down, It Inlarges. ...

Cheese Press
Cheese-press. A Press Employed In Cheese Dairies, To Force The Whey From The Curd When In The Cheese Vat. Cheese Presses Are Of Different Forms. The Most Simple And Primitive Press Is Merely A Long Beam, One End Of Which Is Placed In A Hole Of The Wall, And Frequently ...

Cheese
Cheese (lat. Caseus ; Sax. Eere). A Well Known Kind Of Food, Prepared From Milk By Coagulation, And Separated From The Serum Or Whey, By Means Of Pressure, After Which It Is Dried For Use. See Butter. Cheese Has Been Made From A Very Ancient Period ; It Is Men ...

Chelone
Chelone (chelone Barbata. From Chelone, A Tortoise; To The Back Of Which The Helmet Of The Flowers Is Fancifully Compared). Known In Pennsylvania And Other Middle States By The Names Of Shell-flower, And Snake-head. This Plant Is A Native Of North America, And A Hardy Perennial; Blowing Beautiful Red Flowers ...

Chemistry Analysis
Analysis, Chemistry, 'organic Chemistry, Gases, Earths, Water, Salts, &c., I Have Endeavoured To Include All The Facts Supplied By This Important Science For The Assistance Of The Farmer With Which I Am Acquainted; I Shall, Therefore, Merely Insert In This Place The Chemical Analysis Of The Inorganic Sub Stances Found ...

Cherry Tree Borer
Cherry Tree Borer. See Holism. Cherry-laurel (cerasus Lauro-cerasus). This Shrub Is An Exotic, Although It Is Now ' Naturalized To This Climate, And Was Brought To Europe From Trebisonde, In 1576. It Is An Evergreen, With Smooth Bark, And Short-stalked, Oblong, Lanceolate, Remotely Serrated, Coriace Ous, Shining Leaves, With Two ...