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Georgia Bark
Georgia Bark (pinckneya Pubens). "this Tree," Says Michaux, The Younger, "still More Interesting By The Properties Of Its Bark, Than By The Elegance Of Its Flowers And Of Its Foliage, Is Indigenous To The Most Southern Parts Of The United States : Probably It Grows Also In The Two Floridas ...

Geranium
Geranium. From A Greek Word Signify Ing A Crane, The Beaked Fruit Bearing Some Resemblance To A Crane's Bill. The Varieties Of This Genus Of Beautiful Plants Cultivated Are Very Numerous, But All Are Tender. The Common Scarlet Geranium Is The Hardiest Shrub, And The Handsomest. It Looks Beautiful Plant ...

Germander
Germander (teucriwm). Of This Genus Of Perennial Plants There Are Three Wild Species Common To England. 1. The Wood German Der, Or Wood Sage (t. Scorodonia), Which Is Found Growing Very Profusely In Heathy, Bushy Places And Woods, On A Sandy Soil, And Flowers In The Month Of July. The ...

Germany
Germany. The Agriculture Of A Distric So Extensive As That Of Germany, Naturally Varies With The Nature Of The Climate And The Degree Of Knowledge Possessed By The Inhabi Tants Of The Numerous And Extensive Provinces Of Which The Empire Is Composed. In The Mecklenburgs, Or That Portion Of Germany ...

Germination
Germination (lat. Germen>. The Pro Cess By Which A Plant Is Produced From A Seed. It Is, In Truth, The Springing Into Life Of A New Individual. The Phenomena Of Germination Are Best Observed In Dicotredonous Seeds ; Such, For Instance, As The Beau, Pea, Lupin, &c. These Seeds Consist ...

Gestation Calving
Calving, Gestation, &c., I Have Gone Vary Fully Into This Subject. The Following Excellent Observations By Mr. Youatt, On The Detection Of Pregnancy In The Mare And The Cow, Are Highly Practical And Useful. Among Healthy Animals, The Impregnation Of The Female Rarely Fails To Be The Result Of An ...

Gestation
Gestation. The Gestatory Term In Quad Rupeds Is Much Regulated By Their Bulk. In The Elephant It Is About 20 Months, In The Camel Between 11 And 12, In The Mare And Ass The Same. According To The Observations Of M. Teissier Of Paris, In 582 Mares, Which Copu Lated ...

Ginseng
Ginseng (panax Guinquefolinm, Five-leaved Panax). This American Plant, Which Has Great Commercial Importance, Has A Perennial Foot, Which Sends Up Annually A Smooth, Round Stern, About A Foot In Height, Dividing At The Summit Into Three Leafstalks, Each Of /which Supports A Compound Leaf, Consisting Of Five, Or More Rarely ...

Glanders
Glanders. A Disease In Horses, Attended With A Copious Discharge Of Mucus From The Nose. It Is Needless To Endeavour To Describe The Various Attempts Which Have Been Made To Cure This Almost Invariably Fatal Disorder. But The Farmer Must Avoid A Common Error Of Con Founding Ulceration Of The ...

Glow Worm
Glow-worm (larnpyris Noctiluca). This Insect Is Remarkable For The Light It Emits Dur Ing The Night. This Luminous Appearance De Pends Upon A Phosphorescent Fluid Found At The Lower Extremity Of The Insect ; Which, By Unfolding Or Contracting Itself, It Can Withdraw At Pleasure ; A Power Of Consequence ...

Gluten
Gluten (lat.). The Viscid Elastic Sub Stance Which Remains When Wheat Flour Is Wrapt In A Coarse Cloth, And Washed Under A Stream Of Water, So As To Carry Off The Starch And Soluble Matters. Gluten, When Pure, Is Inodorous, Insipid, Tenacious, Adhesive, And Elastic. It Is Insoluble In Water, ...

Gnats
Gnats (cuter, Linn.). A Genus Of Insects Comprising Several Species, Which Are Well Known By The Severe Punctures They Inflict. The Gnat Most Common In Europe Is The C. Pipiens, So Named From The Sound Which It Emits In Its Flight. The Sting Consists Of 5 Pieces And A Sheath ...

Goats Beard
Goat's-beard (tragopogon). Of This Common Pasture-weed There Are Two Species 1. The Yellow Goat's-beard (t. Pratensis), A Biennial, Growing In Grassy Pastures And Mea Dows, On A Loamy Or Clayey Damp Soil. The Root Is Tapering, Flowering In June ; The Whole Herb Very Smooth, Abounding With Milky Juice, Rather ...

Goats
Goats (capra). There Are Three Species Of This Genus Enumerated By Naturalists. 1. The Wild Goat (c. Agagrus); 2. The Ibex (c. Ibex); 3. The Caucasian Ibex (c. Caucasia): Of These, The First Is Believed To Be The Original Of The Many Varieties Of The Domestic Goat. The Goat Appears ...

Gold Of Pleasure
Gold Of Pleasure (camelina Sativa, Wild Flax). This Is Rather A Dwarf Plant, Grow Ing From 1 To 2 Feet High, Which Is Found In Cultivated Fields, Chiefly Among Flax, With Whose Seeds It Is Often Introduced From' Abroad ; But It Does Not Long Propagate Itself With Us Spon ...

Gold
Gold And Silver Fish. These Creatures Were First Introduced Into Eng Land From China About The Close Of The 17th Tentury. The First Are Of An Orange Colour, With Very Shining Scales, And Finely Variegated With Black And Dark Brown. The Silver Fish Are Of The Colour Of Silver Tissue, ...

Golden Club
Golden Club, Called Also Never-wet, And Floating Arum (orontium Aquaticum). A Plant Not Unfrequent In Pools Along The Fresh Water Streams Of The United States. It Has A Perennial Root, Leaves Enlarging, Finally To 8, 10, Or 12 Inches Long, And 3 To 5 Inches Wide, A Little Succulent, Very ...

Golden Rod
Golden-rod (solidago, From Solidare, To Unite, On Account Of The Supposed Vulnerary Qualities Of The Plants). This Is An Extensive Genus Of Coarse Flowering Plants Suitable For The Back Of Flower Borders. Any Common Soil Suits Them, And They Are Readily Increased By Division Of The Roots. The Common Golden ...

Golden Saxifrage
Golden-saxifrage (chrysosplenivint, From Chrysos, Gold, And Splen, The Spleen, In Reference To The Deep Yellow Colour Of The Flow Ers, And The Supposed Medicinal Virtues Of The Plant). This Is A Curious And Rather Pretty Genus. It Requires A Moist Situation, And May Be Increased By Dividing The Roots. The ...

Goose Grass
Goose-grass (galiwm Trificlunn). Three Cleft Galium ; Also Known By The Common Name Of Ladies Bed-straw. This Native Ame Rican Plant Is Met With In Moist, Low Grounds And Thickets, Where Its Small, White Flowers Appear In July. Its Root Is Perennial, The Stern Rising 1, 2, Or 3 Feet ...

Goose
Goose. A Well-known Large, Web-footed Bird, Belonging To The Order Natatores, Or Swim Mers. These Are Remarkable For Their Powers Of Swimming And Diving; They Are Commonly Called Water-fowl, And, As An Order, Have Fre Quently Been Designated Palmipedes, In Reference To Their Webbed Feet. From The Geographical Position, Extent, ...

Gooseberry
Gooseberry (ribes Grossularia). The Gooseberry Is Indigenous To Great Britain, Some Other European Countries Of Cool Tem Perature, And Also To The Mountains Of North America. The Varieties Of This Fruit Are Too Numerous To Notice. By Some Botanists They Are Referred To Two Species, Ribes Grossularia, The Rough Gooseberry, ...

Goosefoot
Goosefoot (chenopodiunn). An Extensive Genus Of Plants, Of Which 13 Species Are Enu Merated By Sir J. E. Smith, As Natives Of Britain, Viz. 1. Mercury Goosefoot (c. Bonus Henricus), Growing In Waste Ground And By Road Sides Quent, And Occasionally In Pastures. The Root Is Hranchy And Fleshy ; ...

Gossypium
Gossypium. The Generic Name Of Cotton. This Plant, Which Administers So Greatly To The Wants Of Man, And To The Wealth Of Countries Producing It Abundantly, Has Been Known And Employed By The Asiatics And Egyptians In The Fabrication Of Clothing, From The Earliest Dates Of Antiquity That Have Reached ...

Gourd
Gourd (lagenaria Vulgario, Calabash). The Gourd Family Flourish Well In The United States In The Open Air, And The Several Varieties Make Up A Large Amount Of The Produce Of The Gar Dens And Farms. The Large Bottle Gourds Are Extremely Useful Among The Country People, By Whom They Are ...

Grafting
Grafting. The Operation Of Affixing A Portion Of One Plant Upon Another, So As To Pro Duce A Vital Union Between Them, As Been Practised From The Most Remote Antiquity. In Ge Neral, All The Species Of One Genus Or Tribe May Be Grafted On Another Reciprocally ; But In ...

Grain Weevils
Grain-weevils And Moths. In Ea Ope, Stored Grain Is Often Subject To Serio'as In Ury From The Depredations Of Two Little It:sects, Nd Attacked In The Same Way, And Apparermy 313 565 By The Same Kind Of Insects In The United States. "the European Grain-moth, (tinea Granella), In Its Perfected ...

Grain
Grain (french Graine ; Ital. Gran ; Nor Grion, Corn). The General Name Of All Kinds Of Corn. See Wheat, Maize, Oats, Barley, Cons-laws, &c. It Means, In Another Sense, The Seed Of Any Fruit, The Direction Of The Fibres Of Wood, &c.; The Form Of The Surface, With. Regard ...

Granary
Granary. A Place Where Corn Is Stored. These Have Of Necessity Been Constructed In All Ages Of The World, And Of Different Mate Rials, According To The Facilities Afforded For Their Construction By The Neighbourhood In Which They Are Placed ; In England They Are Commonly, For Farming Purposes, Made ...

Grape Vine Caterpillar
Grape-vine Caterpillar. Every Person, Says Dr. Harris, Who Has Paid Any Attention To The Cultivation Of The Grape-vinejin This Country, Must Have Observed Upon It, Be. Sides The Large Sphynx Caterpillars That Devour Its Leaves, A Small Blue Caterpillar Transversely Banded With Deep Orange Across The Middle Of Each Ring, ...

Grass
Grass (goth. Gras ; Icel. Graes, 'from Gro, To Germinate, To Sprout). The Common Herbage Of The Field On Which Cattle Feed. The Grasses, It Has Been Often And Well Said, " Are Nature's Care." There Is, Perhaps, No Class Of The Vegetable World So Little Under Stood As This. ...

Grasshopper
Grasshopper (gryllida). The Destruc Tive Insects, Popularly Known In The United States By The Name Of Grasshoppers, But Which, In Our Version Of The Bible, And In Other Works In The English Language, Are Called Locusts, Have, From A Period Of Very High Antiquity, Attracted The Attention Of Mankind By ...

Grass_3
Grass. 7. Annual Meadow-grass, Suffolk-grass (p. Annua), Pl. 6, C. This Is An Exceedingly Com Mon Species Everywhere, As Well In Waste As Cultivated Ground, Flowering From April To No Vember. The Root Is Fibrous. Stems Pale, Very Smooth, Oblique, Compressed, 3 To 12 Inches Long. Leaves Of A Fine ...

Grazier
Grazier. A Person Engaged In The Art Or Business Of Pasturing Or Feeding And Fattening Different Kinds Of Live-stock On Grass-land. In Order To Be Capable Of Managing This Business To The Greatest Advantage, He Should Have A Perfect Knowledge Of The Nature And Value Of All Kinds Of Live-stock, ...

Grease
Grease. In Farriery, A Disease Incident To Horses Or Other Cattle, Consisting Of A Swelling And Inflammation Of The Legs. It Is Sometimes Confined To The Neighbour. Hood Of The Fetlocks ; At Other Times Spreading Considerably Further Up The Legs, And Secreting An Oily Matter, To Which The Disease ...

Grease_2
Grease, For Wheels And Machinery. • M. D'ar Cet, The Celebrated French Chemist And Master Of The Mint, Recommends The Following As The Best Grease For Wheels And Machinery; Viz., 80 Parts Of Grease And 20 Parts Of Plumbago (black Lead), Reduced To Very Fine Powder, And Most Intimately And ...

Green Crops
Green Crops. Crops, In England, Which Are Consumed On The Farm In Their Unripe State. (see Cabbages, Tares, Turnips, Carrots, Rotation Op Crops, &c.) One Of The Many Great Improvements In Modern Farming, Has Been The General Introduction Of Green Crops, A Practice Which I Think Will Yet Be Materially ...

Green Food
Green Food. Such Food As Is Made Use Of In Its Green, Succulent State, In The Feeding And Support Of Different Sorts Of Live-stock. This Kind Of Food. Has Lately Been Much More Extensively Employed Than Formerly; But Its Advantages Are Not, Probably, Yet So Fully Un Derstood By Farmers ...

Green Grass
Green Grass (poa Uiridis, Poa Annua). A Native Of The United States, And Especially Of The Middle And Northern States, Where It Grows In All Meadows And Rich Soils.—pl. 6. E. Dr. Muhlenburg Says It Is Not Described By Linnmus, Though Nearly Allied To His Poa Amps Tifolia. It May ...

Green House
Green-house. In Gardening, A House With A Roof And One Or More Sides Of Glass, For The Purpose Of Containing Plants In Pots Which Are Too Tender To Endure The Open Air The Greater Part Of The Year. The Green-house, Being A Structure Of Luxury, Ought To Be For The ...

Green Manures
Green Manures. Thr Use Of Green Manures Early Attracted The Attention Of The Cultivator. Xenophon Recommended Green 3 C 2 581 Plants To Be Ploughed Into The Soil, And Even That Crops Should Be Raised For That, Purpose ; For These, He Says, "enrich The Soil As Much As Dung." ...

Green Sand
Green Sand. This Mineral Fertilizer, Which, In Some Portions Of The United States, Has Been Of Such Immense Service As A Manure, And Especially In Restoring Worn-out Soils To Produc Tiveness, Is Found In Great Abundance In Certain Portions Of The Atlantic States. The Stratum In Which It Abounds As ...

Greyhound
Greyhound. This Is One Of The Principa_ Coursing Agents, Being A Dog Remarkable For His Swiftness, Strength, And Sagacity, In Pursu Ing Game. There Are Several Varieties, Such As The Ito, Tian, The Oriental, And The Highland Greyhound; The Last Of Which Is Now Become Exceedingly Scarce. A Good Greyhound ...

Grip
Grip. A Small Gutter, Or Ditch, Cut Across A Field, To Drain It. When Cut For Draining, It Is Mostly Called A Water Or Draining Furrow. A Good Method Of Draining Meadow Or Sward Land, By Grips, Is That Of Cutting Out The Pieces In A Somewhat Wedge-like Form, Taking ...

Groats
Groats. In Agriculture, Are The Small Grains Formed From Oats After Having The Husks Or Shells Taken Off The Grain. When Crushed, They Are Called Embden Groats. Gruel Made From Groats Is A Mild, Little Nutritive, Easily Digested Food, Well Adapted For Cases Of Fever And Inflammation. An Ounce Of ...

Gromwell Gray Millet
Gromwell ; Gray Millet (lithosper Mum, From Lithos A Stone, And Sperms A Seed. The Little Nuts Or Seeds Being Extremely Hard, And Having A Surface As Smooth As A Polished Pebble). Of This Herbaceous Perennial Plant There Are Four Indigenous Species In England. 1. The Common Gromwell (l. Officinale), ...

Groom
Groom (fleur. Grom, A Boy). A Name Now Usually Applied To Servants Who Are Employed About Horses. The Chief Requisites In A Groom Are, A Mild Disposition, And A Fondness For The Animals Of Which He Has The Care. Great Atten Tion Is Also Necessary To The Feeding, Dressing, Littering, ...

Ground Cherry
Ground Cherry (physealis Viscose), Clammy Viscosa. The Specific Name Of This American Plant Is Derived From The Greek Word Physa, A Bladder Or Bag, In Allusion To Its In Flated Calyx, Or Seed-pod. It Is Found In Fields, Fence-rows, &c., Where, In The Middle States, It Flowers In July. The ...

Ground Nut
Ground-nut (apios Tuberosa. From Apios A Pear, In Allusion To Its Pear-shaped Tubers) Sometimes Called Wild Bean. An American Plant, Growing In The Middle States, Having A Perennial Root, Producing Oval Tubers Half An Inch Or More In Diameter At The Base Of The Stem. The Stem Is From 4 ...

Grub
Grub. The Common Name For Worms Or Maggots, Hatched From The Eggs Of Beetles. Under The Name Of Gentles, Grubs Are A Prin Cipal Bait To The Angler For Many Kinds Of Fish. The Grub Produces The Beetle, And Is By Some Called The Rook-worm, Because Rooks Are Par Ticularly ...

Guano
Guano. The Name Of A Manure Recently Imported For The First Time Into England, Which Has Long Been Extensively Employed By The Cultivators Of Peru To Fertilize Their Sterile Sandy Places—lands, On Which Occasionally There Is A Total Absence Of Rain For Many Months. This Manure Is The Excrements Of ...

Guinea Corn
Guinea-corn (halms Sorghum, Linn.), An Exotic Vegetable, Growing On The Coast Of Africa ; Its Stalks Are Large, Compact, Gene Rally Attaining The Height Of 7 Or 8 Feet, And Producing Abundance Of Grain. It May Be Ea Sily Raised In Sheltered Situations, Especially In Exhausted Hot-beds And Other Loose ...

Guinea Fowl
Fowl, Guinea, Or Pintado (nwmida Meleagris). These Birds Are Very Wild And Restless In Their Nature, Owing To Their Native Habits. They Are Shy, And Love To Make Their Nests In Dark, Obscure Places, Far From Home ; For Which Reason Their Eggs Are Generally Placed Under A Common Hen ...

Guinea Grass
Guinea Grass. A Valuable Species Of Herbage, Thus Denominated, As It Was First Dis Covered On The Coast Of Guinea, Whence It Was Brought To Jamaica. In Point Of Real Utility, This Plant Ranks, In Jamaica, Next The Sugar Cane; For The Breeding Farms Throughout The Island Were Originally Established, ...

Guinea Pig
Guinea Pig (covia Cobaya). This Curious Little Animal Is Not A Native Of Guinea, But Of Brazil, Whence It Has Been Imported Into Eu Rope. It Is About Seven Inches In Length, And Its White Body Is Variegated With Irregular Black And Orange-coloured Spots. In Their Wild State These Animals ...

Gutta Percha
Gutta Percha. A Peculiar Gummy Sub Stance, Consisting Of The Dried Juice Exuding From Trees Growing Abundantly In Singapore, Borneo, And Other Parts Of The East Indies. The Remark Able Properties Of This Singular Substance Were First Made Known To Us By Dr. Montgomerie, In 1815, Since Which It Has ...

Ha Mburgh Parsley
Parsley, Ha Mburgh This Esculent Is Likewise Known By The Name Broad-leaved And Large-rooted Parsley. It Is Cultivated For Its Root, Which Attains The Size Of A Middling Parsnip, Boiling Exceedingly Tender And Palatable. It Is Eaten Both As A Sauce To I Flesh-meat And In Soups, &c. It Is ...

Hackberry
Hackberry. A Species Of Nettle Tree, A Native Of The United States, Where The Banks Of The Delaware, Above Philadelphia, May Be Con Sidered Its Limit. East Of The Mountains It Is Abundant Only On The Potomac And Susquehanna, Especially Near Columbia And Harrisburg. In The Western Country It Is ...

Halesia
Halesia. The Name Of Two Beautiful Spe Cies Of Shrub, Or Small Trees, Natives Of North Carolina And Other Southern States. They Are Known By The Familiar Names Of Silver-bell And Snow-drop Tree, And Are Highly Ornamental, Producing Very Early, Whilst The Tree Is Com Pletely Leafless, A Profusion Of ...

Ham
Ham (dutch, Hammers; Fr. Jambon). In Commerce Denotes The Thigh Of A Hog Or Bear Salted And Dried, So As To Preserve It In A State Possessing A Pungent And Agreeable Flavour. York, Hants, Wilts, And Cumberland In Eng Land, And Dumfries And Galloway In Scotland, Are The Counties Most ...

Hare
Hare (lepus Timidus). The Hare Is Natu Rally A Timid Animal, And Extremely Swift In Motion When Pursued By Dogs. Hares Are Dispersed Over Almost Every Climate, And Con Sequently The Varieties Are Extremely Numerous ; And The Sizes, Forms, And Habits, Adapted To The Physical Wants Of The Family, ...

Hariff
Hariff, Goose-grass, Cliders, Cleavers, Or Catchweed (galiwm Aparine). Pl. 10, H. This Is An Annual Plant, With A Fibrous Root, Growing In Hedges Almost Everywhere. It Is Found Wild Even In Nepal. The Flowers Are Small, Pale, And Buff-coloured, Few Together, On Lateral Leafy Stalks, And Blowing From May To ...

Harriers
Harriers. A Breed Of Dogs Kept Princi Pally For Hunting The Hare. There Are Three Prominent Varieties Of The Harrier,—the Old Southern Hound, The Modern Harrier, And The Beagle. Subordinate Divisions Occur, And A Cross Breed Is Used In Hunting The Otter. The Modern Harrier Is Little More Than A ...

Harrow
Harrow. For The Chief Portion Of The Following Article, I Am Indebted To The Messrs. Ransome, The Celebrated Agricultural Imple Ment Makers Of Ipswich; Than Whom No Per Sons Can Be Better Acquainted With The Con Struction And Uses Of Different Machines And Implements For Agricultural Purposes. This Instrument Succeeds ...

Harvesting
Harvesting. The Operation Of Pulling, Cutting, Rooting Up, Or Gathering Field Crops, And Drying Or Otherwise Preparing Them For Being Stored Up For Winter Use. The First Harvest Which Occurs In Britain And Similar Climates Is That Of The Forage Grasses, Or Other Plants Made Into Hay; The Next Is ...

Haulm
Haulm. A Name Given To The Stalks Of Beans And Pease. When Well Harvested, These Form A Very Hearty Species Of Fodder. The Stalk Of The Beans Is Indeed Tough And Some What Woody, And Is Therefore Commonly Thrown Out As Farm-yard Litter ; But The Coving Chaff Is Very ...

Hawkbit
Hawkbit (.4pargia). A Genus Of Herbs; 3 E 2 605 Eeous Plants Of Easy Culture. The Indigenous Species Found In Britain Are Four. The Autumnal Hawkbit (4. Autunninalis) Is A Very Common And Troublesome Weed In All Meadows And Pastures. It Varies Very Much In Luxuriance, And Is Often Found ...

Hawkweed
Hawkweed (hieracium, From Hierax, A Hawk, Being Supposed To Sharpen The Sight Of Birds Of Prey). A Very Numerous Perennial Genus, Generally Inhabiting Mountainous Or Woody Situations. They Are, For The Most Part, Pretty Flowering Plants, With Yellow Blossoms, Hut A Great Number Are Mere Weeds. The Herbage, In General, ...

Hay Rick
Hay-rick. Mr. Chambers (corn. To Board Of ..dgr. Vol. Vii. P. 374) Describes An Improved Hay-rick Which Admits Very Freely The Cool Air To Check The Fermentation. A Channel Or Gut Ter, A Foot Wide And Deep, Is Cut Through Ground Marked Out For The Rick, And Two Across, Which ...

Hay
Hay (germ. Heu, Dn. Hovi). Any Kind Of Grass Cut And Dried As Fodder For Cattle. Hay Constitutes The Chief Dependence Of The Farmer And Others As Winter Food For Their Horses And Cattle. The Sale Of Hay Within The Bills Of Mortality, And 30 Miles Round The Cities Of ...

Haymaking
Haymaking. The Operation Of Cutting Down, Drying, And Preparing Grasses And Other Forage Plants For Being Stacked For Winter Use. The Plants Are Mown Down At The Time When They Are Supposed To Contain, Diffused Through Out The Whole Plant, A Maximum Of Nutritious Juices ; Viz., When They Are ...

Hazel Hazel
Hazel, Hazel, Or Stock Nut (cary Lus This Small, Bushy Tree Is Mon Everywhere In Our Hedges And Copses, And Also Grows Wild In Most Parts Of Europe. The Leaves Are Two Inches Wide, Doubly Ser Rated, Light Green, Downy, Especially Beneath. The Catkins Are Barren, Clustered, Or Panicled, Grayish, ...

Heath Grass
Heath Grass (triodia Decumbens). The Genus To Which This Species Belongs Consists Of Hard, Rigid, Perennial Grasses, With Leafy Stems. Inflorescence Variously Panicled. The Decumbent Heath Grass Grows Frequent In Spongy Bogs, And On Barren, Sandy, Mountain Ous Ground. The Root Is Very Slightly Creep Ing, With Strong Fibres. The ...

Heather Heath
Heath, Heather, Or Ling (caffiena And Erica). A Very Large And Varied Genus Of Plants, Of Which The Following Species Are Indigenous To Great Britain :— 1. Common Heath (calluna Vulgaris, Sal. The Erica Communis Of Linnaeus). This Plant Co Vers Many Hundreds Of Acres In The Highlands Of Scotland, ...

Heathy Land
Heathy Land. Ground Which Is Co Vered With Heath. In Many Districts Of The Kingdom Of Great Britain, There Are Immense Tracts Of This Kind Of Land, That, In Their Present State, Are Of Little Value, Except For The Support Of A Few Sheep ; But Which, By Proper Cultiva ...

Hedge Mustard
Hedge Mustard (sisymbrium.) A Genus Composed For The Most Part Of Worthless Annual And Biennial Plants, Flourishing In The Open Ground In Any Soil. The Indigenous Species Are Three, All Annuals. 1. The Common Hedge Mustard (s. Officinale), Growing In Waste Ground, By Road-sides, And On Banks; Very Common In ...

Hedge Parsley
Hedge Parsley (torilis). Of This Use Less Weed There Are In England Three Common Species: The Upright Hedge Parsley (t. Anthris Cus), The Spreading Hedge Parsley (t. Infesta), And The Knotted Hedge Parsley (t. Nodosa). They Are Annual Plants, Growing By Waysides And The Borders Of Fields, Varying In Height ...

Hedge
Hedge. A Living Wall Formed Of Wood, Plants, Sown Or Planted In A Line, And Cut Or Blipped In Such A Manner As To Form A Compact Mass Of Any Degree Of Width Or Height That May Be Required, Either For The Purpose Of Shelter, Separation, Or Defence. The Fences ...

Heliotrope
Heliotrope (heliotropum • From Hellos, The Sun, And Trope, Twining. Tke Flowers Are Said To Turn Towards The Sun). Some Of The Plants Of This Genus Are Highly Valued For The Fragrant Perfume Of Their Flowers, And Are Therefore To Be Met With In Most Gardens. They Succeed Freely In ...

Hemp Agrimony
Hemp Agrimony (eupatorium Cawna Mnvm). A Rough Perennial Herb, Growing In England In Watery, Boggy Places, Especially About The Banks Of Rivers, With A Tufted, Some Wnat Creeping Root,, With Many Long Fibres. Stems Several, 2 Or 3 Feet High, Branched, D..wny, Often Brown Or Purplish, Filled With 618 Pith. ...

Hemp Nettle
Hemp-nettle (galeopsis). A Genus Of Annual Weeds Common 'in Corn Fields, Flower Ing In July, August, And September. Dr. Smith Describes Four Native Species In England. 1. Red Hemp-nettle (g. Ladanwm). 2. Downy Hemp-nettle (g. Villosa). 3. Common Hemp-nettle (g. Tetrahit). 4. Large-flowered Hemp-nettle. Bee Nettle (g. Versicolor). (smith's Eng. ...

Hemp
Hemp (dan. Kamp. Cannabis Sativa). A Very Valuable Plant Of The Nettle Tribe, Urtica Wtich Came, It Is Believed, Originally From India, But Has Long Since Been Naturalized In Various Parts Of Europe. The Chief Cultiva Tion Is Now, For The Most Part, Confined To The Russian Empire, Where It ...

Henbane
Henbane (hyoscyamus Niger). Black Hen Bane. This Annual Herb Abounds About Vil Lages, Road-sides, And Among Rubbish, And In England Flowers In July. Neither Horses, Cattle, Swine, Nor Sheep, Will Touch This Plant, And It Is Not Relished By Goats. The Whole Plant Is Fatal To Poultry, Whence Its Common ...

Herbal
Herbal (lat. Herbarizon). A Collection Of Dried Plants, Such As The Old Botanists Termed Hortus Siccus Or Dry Garden. It Is Also Applied To Books Which Contain A Methodical Arrange Ment Of The Classes, Genera, Species, And Varie Ties Of Plants, Together With An Account Of Their Properties. Dry Herbals ...

Herring
Herring (clupea Harengus). This Well Known Fish Is Found In Great Abundance From The Highest Northern Latitudes Down To The Northern Coast Of France. Large Shoals Of Them Frequent The Coasts Of The British Islands, And Give Employment To A Considerable Num Ber Of Boats And Men, Forming A Principal ...

Hessian Fly
Fly, Hessian. One Of The Most Formida Ble Enemies Of The Wheat Crop In The United States, Is The Far-famed Hessian Fly, A Small Gnat Or Midge, Which Naturalists Have Placed In The Family Of Gall-gnats (cecidomyiadee). The Insects Of This Family Are Very Numerous, And Most Of Them In ...

Hickory Caterpillar
Hickory Caterpillar. Whilst The Wood Of The Hickory Is Preyed Upon By Borers, The Foliage Suffers In The Latter Part Of Summer From Troops Of Caterpillars Covered With Short Spreading Tufts Of White Hairs, With A Row Of Eight Black Tufts On The Back, And Two Long, Slender, Black Pencils ...

Hickory Tree Borer
Hickory Tree Borer. The Hickory Tree Is Much Exposed To The Ravages Of The Larvw Of Wood-eating Insects Or Borers, Which Not Only Attacks The Trees Of The Forests, Hut Those Of Orchards, Especially After They Have Passed Their Prime. The Transformations Of The Insects Take Place In The Trunks ...

Hickory
Hickory. A Common Name Throughout The United States, Applied To Several Species Of The Walnut Genus, Which, In The Variety Of Trees Composing The Vast Original Forests East Of The Mississippi, Ranks After The Oak In The Number Of Its Species. The Botanical Section Which Includes The Hickories, According To ...

Hide Bound
Hide-bound. In Farriery, Applied To A Certain Disease Of Cows And Horses, In Which The Skin Adheres To Their Sides. Want Of Pro Per Care, Spare Diet, And Bad Food, Such As Rank Long Grass In Swampy Situations, And Musty Hay Or Oats, Are The Most Probable Causes Of This ...

Hide Of Land
Hide Of Land (sax. Hyde Lands) Was Considered, In Ancient Britain, To Be Such A Quantity Of Land As One Plough And Its Team Could Plough In A Year. It Was Hence Called A Ploughland. It Was About 100, 120, Or 150 Acres. Bede Calls It A Fandiare, And Says ...

Hides
Hides (sax. Hype; Germ. Haute ; Dutch, Huiden). Generally Speaking, This Term Is Ap Applied To The Skins Of Most Beasts ; But In Commerce It Is Limited To The Strong And Thick Skin Of The Horse, Ox, And Other Large Animals. Hides Are Raw Or Green ; That Is, ...

Highways
Highways Received Their Name From The Roman Method Of Elevating The Road Upon Causeways, Or By Raised Earth. In The English Common Law, Highways Are Roads Common To All The Queen's Subjects, Which The Parish Are Liable To Repair. All Ways, Either For Foot Pas Sengers, Or Carriages And Horses, ...

History Of Agriculture
Agriculture, History Of (lat. Agrioultwra). The Art Of Cultivating The Ground; Tillage, Husbandry, As Distinct From Pasture. (todd's Johnson.) I Shall, In The Present Article, Limit Myself To A Brief Historical Sketch Of Agriculture, Which Became One Of The Sustaining Arts Of Life As Soon As Man Was Ordained To ...

Hoar Frost
Hoar Frost. To The Authorities Quoted In The Article Frost, I Would Add That Of The Re J. Farquharson. He Draws From His Ob Servations The Conclusions That These Frosts Oocur When The Thermometer Is At Ten Feet From The Ground, Of Varying Degrees Of Temperature, Sometimes As High As ...

Hoeing By Hand
Hoeing By Hand. The Hand Hoe Is An Instrument Too Well Known To Need Any De Scription. The Operation Of Hoeing Is Benefi Cial, Not Only As Being Destructive Of Weeds, But As Loosening The Surface Of The Soil, And Rendering It More Permeable To The Gases And Aqueous Vapour ...

Hogweed
Hogweed (heraclewn Sphondylium). The Weed Known By This Name In Pennsylvania And Other Middle States, Is Also Called Rag-weed And Bitter-weed, The Ambrosia Elatior Or Taller Ambrosia Of Botanical Writers. This Apparently Very Worthless Weed Is Common In Pastures And Cultivated Fields, Always Following The Wheat Crop Immediately After Harvest, ...

Holcus
Holcus. The Soft-grass. A Genus . Of Grasses Of Which Smith, In His Eng. Flor. (vol. P. 107), Describes Three Species, But Whicl Sinclair, In His Hortus Gramineus, Has Extend Ed To 5 Species And Varieties, Including The Northern Holy-grass (hierochloe Borealis), Which Smith Very Properly Refers To Another Class. ...

Holly
Holly (ilex Aquifoliwni). A Handsome Evergreen Tree, Of Slow Growth, With A Smooth, Gray Bark, Which, Abounding In Mucilage, •makes Bird-lime By Maceration In Water. The Wood Is Hard, Close-grained, And Covered With The Above Smooth Gray Bark. The Leaves Are Alternate, Stalked, Rigid, Shining, Waxy, With Spinous Divaricated Lobes ...

Honey
Honey (german, Honig). A Well-known Vegetable Substance Collected By Bees. "its Flavour," Says Dr. A. T. Thomson, "varies According To The Nature Of The Flowers From Which It Is Collected. Thus, The Honeys Of Minorca, Narbonne, And England Are Known By Their Flavours. It Is Separated From The Comb By ...